The Ultra Conservative Catholic

May 12, 2009

Readings May 12, 2009

Filed under: Religion-Catholicism — tobinatorstark @ 1:53 pm

Acts 14:19-27

Now there came thither certain Jews from Antioch, and Iconium: and persuading the multitude, and stoning Paul, drew him out of the city, thinking him to be dead.  But as the disciples stood round about him, he rose up and entered into the city, and the next day he departed with Barnabas to Derbe.  Confirming the souls of the disciples, and exhorting them to continue in the faith: and that through many tribulations we must enter into the kingdom of God. And when they had ordained to them priests in every church, and had prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord, in whom they believed. And passing through Pisidia, they came into Pamphylia.  And having spoken the word of the Lord in Perge, they went down into Attalia: And thence they sailed to Antioch, from whence they had been delivered to the grace of God, unto the work which they accomplished. And when they were come, and had assembled the church, they related what great things God had done with them, and how he had opened the door of faith to the Gentiles.  And they abode no small time with the disciples. And when they had preached the gospel to that city, and had taught many, they returned again to Lystra, and to Iconium, and to Antioch:

Actus Apostolorum 14:19-27

Supervenerunt autem quidam ab Antiochia et Iconio Judæi : et persuasis turbis, lapidantesque Paulum, traxerunt extra civitatem, existimantes eum mortuum esse.  Circumdantibus autem eum discipulis, surgens intravit civitatem, et postera die profectus est cum Barnaba in Derben. Cumque evangelizassent civitati illi, et docuissent multos, reversi sunt Lystram, et Iconium, et Antiochiam,  confirmantes animas discipulorum, exhortantesque ut permanerent in fide : et quoniam per multas tribulationes oportet nos intrare in regnum Dei.  Et cum constituissent illis per singulas ecclesias presbyteros, et orassent cum jejunationibus, commendaverunt eos Domino, in quem crediderunt. Transeuntesque Pisidiam, venerunt in Pamphyliam,  et loquentes verbum Domini in Perge, descenderunt in Attaliam :  et inde navigaverunt Antiochiam, unde erant traditi gratiæ Dei in opus quod compleverunt.  Cum autem venissent, et congregassent ecclesiam, retulerunt quanta fecisset Deus cum illis, et quia aperuisset gentibus ostium fidei.  Morati sunt autem tempus non modicum cum discipulis.

Gospel According St. John 14:27-31

Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, do I give unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, nor let it be afraid.  You have heard that I said to you: I go away, and I come unto you. If you loved me, you would indeed be glad, because I go to the Father: for the Father is greater than I.  And now I have told you before it comes to pass: that when it shall come to pass, you may believe.  I will not now speak many things with you. For the prince of this world cometh, and in me he hath not any thingBut that the world may know, that I love the Father: and as the Father hath given me commandment, so do I: Arise, let us go hence.

Evangelium secundum Joannem 14:27-31

Pacem relinquo vobis, pacem meam do vobis : non quomodo mundus dat, ego do vobis. Non turbetur cor vestrum, neque formidet.  Audistis quia ego dixi vobis : Vado, et venio ad vos. Si diligeretis me, gauderetis utique, quia vado ad Patrem : quia Pater major me est. Et nunc dixi vobis priusquam fiat : ut cum factum fuerit, credatis. Jam non multa loquar vobiscum : venit enim princeps mundi hujus, et in me non habet quidquam.  Sed ut cognoscat mundus quia diligo Patrem, et sicut mandatum dedit mihi Pater, sic facio. Surgite, eamus hinc.

Haydock Bible Commentary – Acts 14:18-27

Ver. 21. Through many tribulations. Our daily offences require the paternal chastisement of the Almighty. The concupiscence of the flesh too, which wills against the spirit, must be subdued by punishment. Woe then to you, lovers of this world, who wish to pass your lives without tribulation, enemies of the cross. Senseless creatures, is the disciple above his master? Did it not become Christ first to suffer, and thus to enter into his glory? and shall we pretend to enter by any other means? &c. (Denis the Carthusian)

Ver. 22. When they had ordained for them priests.[1] The Protestant translation, following the grammatical etymology of the Greek word presbyter, always puts elders. Yet they of the Church of England allow, and maintain, that by this Greek word in this, and many other places, are signified the ministers of God, known by the name of bishops or priests, according to the ecclesiastical use of the same word. It is evident that here are not meant elders, as to age and years. Nay, though we adhere to the grammatical signification, we should rather translate priests, since the English word priest, as well as the French word prêtre, come from presbyter. But of this word more hereafter. We may also take notice, that the Calvinists here translate, ordained by election, pretending by the derivation of the Greek word, that church ministers were only chosen, and deputed by the votes and suffrages of people; and not by any ordination, or consecration by a bishop; nor by any character or sacrament of order. But their argument from this Greek word is frivolous, and groundless, as hath been shewn by Mr. Bois on this verse, by Mr. Legh in his Critica Sacra, &c. (Witham) — We see from this text, 1st, that Sts. Paul and Barnabas were bishops, having authority to confer holy orders: 2nd. that there was even then a difference betwixt bishops and priests, though the name in the primitive Church was often used indifferently; 3rd. that fasting and praying were constant preparatives for holy orders. (Bristow)

Ver. 24. This Antioch was a sea-port in Pamphylia. (Bible de Vence)

Ver. 25. From whence they had been delivered, up to their ministry, and their apostolical mission by the grace of God; that is, where they had been first chosen by the direction of the Spirit of God, ordained priests and bishops, and had received power, and graces to discharge their offices of apostles. (Witham)

Ver. 27. No little time. It is not precisely known how long he remained there, nor what he did. St. Luke relates nothing of what happened from the 46th year of Christ to the 51st [from A.D. 46 to A.D. 51], in which the Council of Jerusalem was held. It is probable St. Paul spent that time carrying the gospel among the neighbouring provinces. (Calmet)

[1] Ver. 22. Cum constituissent presbyteros, cheirotonesantes presbuterous.sæpè parum tutum est, respicias, cheirotonein, nihil aliud declarat, quam constituere, creare, ordinare. See Mr. Legh, in thesauro linguæ græcæ Mr. Bois on this verse: Si usum loquendi potius quam syllabas ipsas, quibus inhærere .


Haydock Bible Commentary John 14:27-31


Ver. 28. The Father is greater than I.[3] According to the common exposition, Christ here speaks of himself, as made man, which interpretation is drawn from the circumstances of the text, Christ being at that time, going to suffer, and die, and shortly after to rise again, and ascend into heaven, all which agree with him, as man, and according to his human nature. But the Arians can take no advantage from these words, (though with divers of the ancient Fathers, we should allow them to be spoken of Christ, as the Son of God:) the Father may be said in some manner to be greater than the Son, if we consider the order of the divine processions, that is, that the Father is the first person, and proceeds from no other; whereas the Son proceeds from the Father. If any one, says St. Chrysostom, will contend, that the Father is greater, inasmuch as he is the cause, from which the Son proceedeth, we will bear with him, and this way of speaking: provided he grant that the Son is not of a different substance, or nature. St. Athanasius allows the same, and takes notice, that though the Father is said to be greater, yet he is not said to be better, nor more excellent, than the Son; because they are one and the same in substance, nature, and other perfections. (Witham) — The enemies of the divinity of Christ here triumph, and think they have the confession of Christ himself, that he is less than the Father. But if they would distinguish the two natures of Christ, their arguments would all fall to the ground. Jesus Christ, as man, and a creature, is inferior to his Father, the Creator; but, as God, he is, in every respect, equal to him. (St. Basil, St. Augustine, &c.) — Others, likewise, answer it thus: Following the confused opinion of the world, and even of the apostles themselves, who as yet only considered Christ as a prophet, and as a man, eminent in virtue and sanctity, he was less than the Father. (St. Chrysostom; Leont.; Theophylactus; Euthymius) — And likewise the title of Father, (as we generally use the word) is greater, and much more honourable, that that of Son; and in this respect, Christ is inferior to his Father. (St. Athanasius; St. Hilary; St. Epiphanius; St. Gregory of Nazianzus; and St. Cyril) —But this appellation, though really true, does not destroy the equality of the persons, because Christ has declared, in numerous other places, that he is equal to the Father; that he is in the Father; and that he and the Father are one. The apostles ought to have rejoiced that Christ was going to the Father, who was superior to him, considering him in his human nature; because, then, would the Son shew forth his honour and glory to be equal to the Father’s, in heaven. This would have been a mark of a pure, solid, and disinterested love, which ought to have inspired the apostles, if they truly loved their divine Master. (Calmet) — Protestants assume to themselves the liberty of making the Bible only, the exclusive rule of faith, yet refuse this privilege to others. Thus Luther insisted, that his catechism should be taught, and followed. Calvin burnt Servetus for explaining his faith, by his own interpretation of the Bible, particularly of these words, the Father is greater than I. The Church of England compels every clergyman to swear to the Thirty-nine Articles, and has inflicted the severest penalties on such as interpreted the Bible according to the principles of Socinus; and on Catholics, who understand the words of Jesus Christ, This is my body: this is my blood, in the literal and obvious sense of the words. As long as each individual is at liberty to expound Scripture by the private spirit, it is a great injustice to compel any one, by penal laws, to yield his judgment to any authority, that is not less fallible than his own.

Ver. 31. As the Father hath given me commandment, so I do. — He again speaks of himself, as man. Arise, let us go hence. Yet by chap. xviii. ver. 1. Christ still continued the like instructions, either in the same place, or in the way to Gethsemani. (Witham)

[3] Ver. 28. Pater major me est, o pater meizon mou estin. St. Chrysostom, hom. oe. p. 443. Nov. Ed. Si quis verò dixerit majorem esse Patrem, ut filii principium, non huic contradicemus, kath o aitios tou uiou, oude touto anteroumen. See St. Athanasius, Orat. 1. Cont. Arianos, p. 362. Ed. Ben. non dixit, Pater præstantior est me, kreiton mon esti, ne quis eum alium à Patris naturà, esse suspicaretur, sed major dixit, non quidem magnitudine quadam, aut tempore, sed quià ex ipso Patre gignitur, &c. See St. Augustine, tract. 78. p. 699. propter forman servi, dicit, Pater major me est, &c.

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