The Ultra Conservative Catholic

May 13, 2009

Readings for May 13, 2009

Filed under: Religion-Catholicism — tobinatorstark @ 11:39 am

Acts 15:1-6

And some coming down from Judea, taught the brethren: That except you be circumcised after the manner of Moses, you cannot be saved.  And when Paul and Barnabas had no small contest with them, they determined that Paul and Barnabas, and certain others of the other side, should go up to the apostles and priests to Jerusalem about this question. They therefore being brought on their way by the church, passed through Phenice, and Samaria, relating the conversion of the Gentiles; and they caused great joy to all the brethren. But there arose some of the sect of the Pharisees that believed, saying: They must be circumcised, and be commanded to observe the law of Moses. And the apostles and ancients assembled to consider of this matter. And when they were come to Jerusalem, they were received by the church, and by the apostles and ancients, declaring how great things God had done with them.

Actus Apostolorum 15:1-6

Et quidam descendentes de Judæa docebant fratres : Quia nisi circumcidamini secundum morem Moysi, non potestis salvari. Facta ergo seditione non minima Paulo et Barnabæ adversus illos, statuerunt ut ascenderent Paulus et Barnabas, et quidam alii ex aliis ad Apostolos et presbyteros in Jerusalem super hac quæstione.  Illi ergo deducti ab ecclesia pertransibant Phœnicen et Samariam, narrantes conversionem gentium : et faciebant gaudium magnum omnibus fratribus.  Cum autem venissent Jerosolymam, suscepti sunt ab ecclesia, et ab Apostolis et senioribus, annuntiantes quanta Deus fecisset cum illis.  Surrexerunt autem quidam de hæresi pharisæorum, qui crediderunt, dicentes quia oportet circumcidi eos, præcipere quoque servare legem Moysi.  Conveneruntque Apostoli et seniores videre de verbo hoc.

Gospel According to St. John 15:1-8

I am the true vine; and my Father is the husbandman. Every branch in me, that beareth not fruit, he will take away: and every one that beareth fruit, he will purge it, that it may bring forth more fruit.  Now you are clean by reason of the word, which I have spoken to you. Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abide in the vine, so neither can you, unless you abide in me.  I am the vine: you the branches: he that abideth in me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit: for without me you can do nothing.  If any one abide not in me, he shall be cast forth as a branch, and shall wither, and they shall gather him up, and cast him into the fire, and he burneth.  If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, you shall ask whatever you will, and it shall be done unto you. In this is my Father glorified; that you bring forth very much fruit, and become my disciples

Evangelium Secundum Joannem 15:1-8

Ego sum vitis vera, et Pater meus agricola est.  Omnem palmitem in me non ferentem fructum, tollet eum, et omnem qui fert fructum, purgabit eum, ut fructum plus afferat.  Jam vos mundi estis propter sermonem quem locutus sum vobis.  Manete in me, et ego in vobis. Sicut palmes non potest ferre fructum a semetipso, nisi manserit in vite, sic nec vos, nisi in me manseritis. Ego sum vitis, vos palmites : qui manet in me, et ego in eo, hic fert fructum multum, quia sine me nihil potestis facere.  Si quis in me non manserit, mittetur foras sicut palmes, et arescet, et colligent eum, et in ignem mittent, et ardet.  Si manseritis in me, et verba mea in vobis manserint, quodcumque volueritis petetis, et fiet vobis.  In hoc clarificatus est Pater meus, ut fructum plurimum afferatis, et efficiamini mei discipuli.

Haydock Bible Commentary- Acts 15:1-6

Ver. 1. Unless you be circumcised. Many who had been converted from Judaism, held that none, not even converted from paganism, could be saved, unless they were circumcised, and observed the other ceremonies of the law of Moses. (Witham) — See Galatians v. 2.

Ver. 2. To the apostles and priests,[1] where we find again presbyters in Greek, meaning bishops and priests. (Witham) — Paul…should go to…Jerusalem. We learn from Galatians ii. 2. 4. that St. Paul undertook this journey in consequence of a divine revelation, and was accompanied by Barnabas and Titus, the latter of whom he would not suffer to be circumcised. Such confidence had he in the rectitude of the opinion he defended. From the example of St. Paul and St. Barnabas, apostles, and men full of the Spirit of God, we learn, that as often as any contest arises about faith, recourse should be had to the supreme visible authority established by Jesus Christ, to have all differences adjusted. This is the order of divine Providence with regard to the Church; without it truth and unity could not be preserved; without it, the Church of God would be more defective and inefficient than any human government. Tell the Church: and if he will not hear the Church, let him be to thee as the heathen and the publican. (Matthew xviii. 17.)

[1] Ver. 2. presbuterous; presbyteros. For the same Greek word we sometimes find in the vulgar Latin, presbyteros, sometimes seniores, sometimes majores natu: yet it is generally a word of dignity in the ministry of Christ, signifying those who were afterwards known by the name of bishops or priests. When mention is made of presbuteros, or seniores, of the old law, I have translated elders: but where the ministers of the new law are understood, when in the Latin we have presbyteri, I have put priests; when majores natu or seniores, I have put in English seniors, bishops or priests, being to be understood.

Haydock Bible Commentary John 15:1-8

Ver 1. I am the true vine. Christ, says St. Augustine, speaks of himself, as man, when he compares himself to a vine, his disciples to the branches, and his Father to the husbandman. He himself, as God, is also the husbandman. — Without me, you can do nothing, that shall be meritorious of a reward in heaven. (Witham) — These words are supposed to have been spoken by our Saviour, when on the road, as he was going from the house, where he had supped, to the garden of Olives. It was then about midnight. (Calmet) — Though many other interpreters think they were spoken before Jesus Christ left the house.

Ver. 2. He here shews, that the virtuous themselves stand in need of the help of the husbandman; therefore the Almighty sends them tribulations, and temptations, that they may be cleansed, and rendered firm, like the vine, which, the more it is pruned, the more vigorous are its shoots. (St. Chrysostom, hom. lxxv. in Joan.)

Ver. 3. See John xiii. 10.

Ver. 7. On account of our being in this world, we sometimes ask for that, which is not expedient for us. But these things will not be granted us, if we remain in Christ, who never grants us any thing, unless it be profitable to us. (St. Augustine, tract. 81. in Joan.) — If we abide in Christ, by a lively faith, and his words abide in us by a lively, ardent charity, which can make us produce the fruits of good works, all that we ask, will be granted us. (Bible de Vence) — These conditional expressions, if you remain in the vine, if you keep my commandments, &c. give us to understand, that our perseverance and salvation are upon conditions, to be fulfilled by us. — (St. Augustine, de cor. & gra. chap. 13.)

Ver. 8. It is the glory of the husbandman, to see his vine well cultivated, and laden with fruit. And it is the glory of God, my Father, to see you filled with faith, charity, and good works, and to behold you usefully employed, in the conversion of others. Then will men, seeing your good works, and the fruit of your preaching, among all nations, glorify your heavenly Father, as the author of all these blessings. (St. Matthew v. 16.) (Calmet)

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May 12, 2009

update

Filed under: Religion-Catholicism — tobinatorstark @ 2:02 pm

Starting next week I am branching out instead of Scripture readings only, I will have a variety of different Catholic reading Material. Sunday’s will be Tridentine Latin Mass readings in Latin only, Mondays will be Novus Ordo readings in English only. Post 2 of the day will be Liturgy of the Hours readings and Catechism of the Catholic Church reading. Tuesdays will be Novus Ordo readings in Latin only and post 2 will be Catechism and LOTH reading just as the day before.  Wednesday and Friday will be the same as Monday. Thursday and Saturday will be the same as Tuesday. All scripture reading will contain Douay-Rheims in English and Clementine Vulgate in Latin. Catechism Readings will be in English only. Liturgy of the Hours will contain readings from the New American Bible and Psalms according to the Grail Psalms of 1963

Readings May 12, 2009

Filed under: Religion-Catholicism — tobinatorstark @ 1:53 pm

Acts 14:19-27

Now there came thither certain Jews from Antioch, and Iconium: and persuading the multitude, and stoning Paul, drew him out of the city, thinking him to be dead.  But as the disciples stood round about him, he rose up and entered into the city, and the next day he departed with Barnabas to Derbe.  Confirming the souls of the disciples, and exhorting them to continue in the faith: and that through many tribulations we must enter into the kingdom of God. And when they had ordained to them priests in every church, and had prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord, in whom they believed. And passing through Pisidia, they came into Pamphylia.  And having spoken the word of the Lord in Perge, they went down into Attalia: And thence they sailed to Antioch, from whence they had been delivered to the grace of God, unto the work which they accomplished. And when they were come, and had assembled the church, they related what great things God had done with them, and how he had opened the door of faith to the Gentiles.  And they abode no small time with the disciples. And when they had preached the gospel to that city, and had taught many, they returned again to Lystra, and to Iconium, and to Antioch:

Actus Apostolorum 14:19-27

Supervenerunt autem quidam ab Antiochia et Iconio Judæi : et persuasis turbis, lapidantesque Paulum, traxerunt extra civitatem, existimantes eum mortuum esse.  Circumdantibus autem eum discipulis, surgens intravit civitatem, et postera die profectus est cum Barnaba in Derben. Cumque evangelizassent civitati illi, et docuissent multos, reversi sunt Lystram, et Iconium, et Antiochiam,  confirmantes animas discipulorum, exhortantesque ut permanerent in fide : et quoniam per multas tribulationes oportet nos intrare in regnum Dei.  Et cum constituissent illis per singulas ecclesias presbyteros, et orassent cum jejunationibus, commendaverunt eos Domino, in quem crediderunt. Transeuntesque Pisidiam, venerunt in Pamphyliam,  et loquentes verbum Domini in Perge, descenderunt in Attaliam :  et inde navigaverunt Antiochiam, unde erant traditi gratiæ Dei in opus quod compleverunt.  Cum autem venissent, et congregassent ecclesiam, retulerunt quanta fecisset Deus cum illis, et quia aperuisset gentibus ostium fidei.  Morati sunt autem tempus non modicum cum discipulis.

Gospel According St. John 14:27-31

Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, do I give unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, nor let it be afraid.  You have heard that I said to you: I go away, and I come unto you. If you loved me, you would indeed be glad, because I go to the Father: for the Father is greater than I.  And now I have told you before it comes to pass: that when it shall come to pass, you may believe.  I will not now speak many things with you. For the prince of this world cometh, and in me he hath not any thingBut that the world may know, that I love the Father: and as the Father hath given me commandment, so do I: Arise, let us go hence.

Evangelium secundum Joannem 14:27-31

Pacem relinquo vobis, pacem meam do vobis : non quomodo mundus dat, ego do vobis. Non turbetur cor vestrum, neque formidet.  Audistis quia ego dixi vobis : Vado, et venio ad vos. Si diligeretis me, gauderetis utique, quia vado ad Patrem : quia Pater major me est. Et nunc dixi vobis priusquam fiat : ut cum factum fuerit, credatis. Jam non multa loquar vobiscum : venit enim princeps mundi hujus, et in me non habet quidquam.  Sed ut cognoscat mundus quia diligo Patrem, et sicut mandatum dedit mihi Pater, sic facio. Surgite, eamus hinc.

Haydock Bible Commentary – Acts 14:18-27

Ver. 21. Through many tribulations. Our daily offences require the paternal chastisement of the Almighty. The concupiscence of the flesh too, which wills against the spirit, must be subdued by punishment. Woe then to you, lovers of this world, who wish to pass your lives without tribulation, enemies of the cross. Senseless creatures, is the disciple above his master? Did it not become Christ first to suffer, and thus to enter into his glory? and shall we pretend to enter by any other means? &c. (Denis the Carthusian)

Ver. 22. When they had ordained for them priests.[1] The Protestant translation, following the grammatical etymology of the Greek word presbyter, always puts elders. Yet they of the Church of England allow, and maintain, that by this Greek word in this, and many other places, are signified the ministers of God, known by the name of bishops or priests, according to the ecclesiastical use of the same word. It is evident that here are not meant elders, as to age and years. Nay, though we adhere to the grammatical signification, we should rather translate priests, since the English word priest, as well as the French word prêtre, come from presbyter. But of this word more hereafter. We may also take notice, that the Calvinists here translate, ordained by election, pretending by the derivation of the Greek word, that church ministers were only chosen, and deputed by the votes and suffrages of people; and not by any ordination, or consecration by a bishop; nor by any character or sacrament of order. But their argument from this Greek word is frivolous, and groundless, as hath been shewn by Mr. Bois on this verse, by Mr. Legh in his Critica Sacra, &c. (Witham) — We see from this text, 1st, that Sts. Paul and Barnabas were bishops, having authority to confer holy orders: 2nd. that there was even then a difference betwixt bishops and priests, though the name in the primitive Church was often used indifferently; 3rd. that fasting and praying were constant preparatives for holy orders. (Bristow)

Ver. 24. This Antioch was a sea-port in Pamphylia. (Bible de Vence)

Ver. 25. From whence they had been delivered, up to their ministry, and their apostolical mission by the grace of God; that is, where they had been first chosen by the direction of the Spirit of God, ordained priests and bishops, and had received power, and graces to discharge their offices of apostles. (Witham)

Ver. 27. No little time. It is not precisely known how long he remained there, nor what he did. St. Luke relates nothing of what happened from the 46th year of Christ to the 51st [from A.D. 46 to A.D. 51], in which the Council of Jerusalem was held. It is probable St. Paul spent that time carrying the gospel among the neighbouring provinces. (Calmet)

[1] Ver. 22. Cum constituissent presbyteros, cheirotonesantes presbuterous.sæpè parum tutum est, respicias, cheirotonein, nihil aliud declarat, quam constituere, creare, ordinare. See Mr. Legh, in thesauro linguæ græcæ Mr. Bois on this verse: Si usum loquendi potius quam syllabas ipsas, quibus inhærere .


Haydock Bible Commentary John 14:27-31


Ver. 28. The Father is greater than I.[3] According to the common exposition, Christ here speaks of himself, as made man, which interpretation is drawn from the circumstances of the text, Christ being at that time, going to suffer, and die, and shortly after to rise again, and ascend into heaven, all which agree with him, as man, and according to his human nature. But the Arians can take no advantage from these words, (though with divers of the ancient Fathers, we should allow them to be spoken of Christ, as the Son of God:) the Father may be said in some manner to be greater than the Son, if we consider the order of the divine processions, that is, that the Father is the first person, and proceeds from no other; whereas the Son proceeds from the Father. If any one, says St. Chrysostom, will contend, that the Father is greater, inasmuch as he is the cause, from which the Son proceedeth, we will bear with him, and this way of speaking: provided he grant that the Son is not of a different substance, or nature. St. Athanasius allows the same, and takes notice, that though the Father is said to be greater, yet he is not said to be better, nor more excellent, than the Son; because they are one and the same in substance, nature, and other perfections. (Witham) — The enemies of the divinity of Christ here triumph, and think they have the confession of Christ himself, that he is less than the Father. But if they would distinguish the two natures of Christ, their arguments would all fall to the ground. Jesus Christ, as man, and a creature, is inferior to his Father, the Creator; but, as God, he is, in every respect, equal to him. (St. Basil, St. Augustine, &c.) — Others, likewise, answer it thus: Following the confused opinion of the world, and even of the apostles themselves, who as yet only considered Christ as a prophet, and as a man, eminent in virtue and sanctity, he was less than the Father. (St. Chrysostom; Leont.; Theophylactus; Euthymius) — And likewise the title of Father, (as we generally use the word) is greater, and much more honourable, that that of Son; and in this respect, Christ is inferior to his Father. (St. Athanasius; St. Hilary; St. Epiphanius; St. Gregory of Nazianzus; and St. Cyril) —But this appellation, though really true, does not destroy the equality of the persons, because Christ has declared, in numerous other places, that he is equal to the Father; that he is in the Father; and that he and the Father are one. The apostles ought to have rejoiced that Christ was going to the Father, who was superior to him, considering him in his human nature; because, then, would the Son shew forth his honour and glory to be equal to the Father’s, in heaven. This would have been a mark of a pure, solid, and disinterested love, which ought to have inspired the apostles, if they truly loved their divine Master. (Calmet) — Protestants assume to themselves the liberty of making the Bible only, the exclusive rule of faith, yet refuse this privilege to others. Thus Luther insisted, that his catechism should be taught, and followed. Calvin burnt Servetus for explaining his faith, by his own interpretation of the Bible, particularly of these words, the Father is greater than I. The Church of England compels every clergyman to swear to the Thirty-nine Articles, and has inflicted the severest penalties on such as interpreted the Bible according to the principles of Socinus; and on Catholics, who understand the words of Jesus Christ, This is my body: this is my blood, in the literal and obvious sense of the words. As long as each individual is at liberty to expound Scripture by the private spirit, it is a great injustice to compel any one, by penal laws, to yield his judgment to any authority, that is not less fallible than his own.

Ver. 31. As the Father hath given me commandment, so I do. — He again speaks of himself, as man. Arise, let us go hence. Yet by chap. xviii. ver. 1. Christ still continued the like instructions, either in the same place, or in the way to Gethsemani. (Witham)

[3] Ver. 28. Pater major me est, o pater meizon mou estin. St. Chrysostom, hom. oe. p. 443. Nov. Ed. Si quis verò dixerit majorem esse Patrem, ut filii principium, non huic contradicemus, kath o aitios tou uiou, oude touto anteroumen. See St. Athanasius, Orat. 1. Cont. Arianos, p. 362. Ed. Ben. non dixit, Pater præstantior est me, kreiton mon esti, ne quis eum alium à Patris naturà, esse suspicaretur, sed major dixit, non quidem magnitudine quadam, aut tempore, sed quià ex ipso Patre gignitur, &c. See St. Augustine, tract. 78. p. 699. propter forman servi, dicit, Pater major me est, &c.

May 9, 2009

Tridentine Latin Mass readings for May 10, 2009

Filed under: Religion-Catholicism — tobinatorstark @ 9:51 am

5th Sunday of Easter

Epistle of James 1:22-27

But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. For if a man be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he shall be compared to a man beholding his own countenance in a glass.  For he beheld himself, and went his way, and presently forgot what manner of man he was.  But he that hath looked into the perfect law of liberty, and hath continued therein, not becoming a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work; this man shall be blessed in his deed. And if any man think himself to be religious, not bridling his tongue, but deceiving his own heart, this man’s religion is vain.  Religion clean and undefiled before God and the Father, is this: to visit the fatherless and widows in their tribulation: and to keep one’s self unspotted from this world.


Epistola Catholica B. Jacobi Apostoli

Estote autem factores verbi, et non auditores tantum : fallentes vosmetipsos. Quia si quis auditor est verbi, et non factor, hic comparabitur viro consideranti vultum nativitatis suæ in speculo :  consideravit enim se, et abiit, et statim oblitus est qualis fuerit. Qui autem perspexerit in legem perfectam libertatis, et permanserit in ea, non auditor obliviosus factus, sed factor operis : hic beatus in facto suo erit.  Si quis autem putat se religiosum esse, non refrenans linguam suam, sed seducens cor suum, hujus vana est religio.  Religio munda et immaculata apud Deum et Patrem, hæc est : visitare pupillos et viduas in tribulatione eorum, et immaculatum se custodire ab hoc sæculo.


Gospel According to St. John 16:22-30

So also you now indeed have sorrow; but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice; and your joy no man shall take from you. And in that day you shall not ask me any thing. Amen, amen I say to you: if you ask the Father any thing in my name, he will give it you.  Hitherto you have not asked any thing in my name. Ask, and you shall receive; that your joy may be full. These things I have spoken to you in proverbs. The hour cometh, when I will no more speak to you in proverbs, but will shew you plainly of the Father.  In that day you shall ask in my name; and I say not to you, that I will ask the Father for you:  For the Father himself loveth you, because you have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again I leave the world, and I go to the Father.  His disciples say to him: Behold, now thou speakest plainly, and speakest no proverb.  Now we know that thou knowest all things, and thou needest not that any man should ask thee. By this we believe that thou camest forth from God.


EVANGELIUM SECUNDUM JOANNEM 16:22-30

Et vos igitur nunc quidem tristitiam habetis, iterum autem videbo vos, et gaudebit cor vestrum : et gaudium vestrum nemo tollet a vobis.  Et in illo die me non rogabitis quidquam. Amen, amen dico vobis : si quid petieritis Patrem in nomine meo, dabit vobis. Usque modo non petistis quidquam in nomine meo : petite, et accipietis, ut gaudium vestrum sit plenum. Hæc in proverbiis locutus sum vobis. Venit hora cum jam non in proverbiis loquar vobis, sed palam de Patre annuntiabo vobis : in illo die in nomine meo
petetis : et non dico vobis quia ego rogabo Patrem de vobis :  ipse enim Pater amat vos, quia vos me amastis, et credidistis, quia ego a Deo exivi. Exivi a Patre, et veni in mundum : iterum relinquo mundum, et vado ad Patrem.  Dicunt ei discipuli ejus : Ecce nunc palam loqueris, et proverbium nullum dicis :  nunc scimus quia scis omnia, et non opus est tibi ut quis te interroget: in hoc credimus quia a Deo existi.


Haydock Bible Commentary James 1:22-27

Ver. 23. He shall be compared to a man, &c. The sense is, that it is not enough for a man to examine and look into his interior, and the state of his conscience in a negligent and superficial manner, no more than one that goes to a looking-glass, but does not take care to take away the dirt or spots which he might discover. (Witham)

Ver. 25. The law of Christ, called here the perfect law of liberty, as it is distinguished from the Jewish law of fear and slavery, is as it were a looking-glass, which may make us know ourselves, and discover and correct our failings. (Witham)

Ver. 26. If any man think, &c. He here blames those hot disputes, which seem to have been frequent amongst the converted Jews, concerning the necessity of observing the legal rites. In vain, says he, do you pique yourselves upon the rigorous observance of the law, and your zeal to unite its ceremonial rites with the practice of the gospel. If you be void of the essence of Christianity, which is charity, prudence, and moderation, your religion will avail you nothing. (Calmet) — This may also be understood of those devotees who are fond of making a parade of their virtues, and who, as St. Gregory says, (hom. xii. in Mat.) afflict their bodies indeed with fasting, but for this they expect to be esteemed by men. (Haydock) — A man must not imagine himself to be religious, and perfect in the way of virtue, unless he governs and bridles his tongue from oaths, curses, calumnies, detractions, lies, of which more in the third chapter. (Witham)

Ver. 27. Religion pure and unspotted, &c. St. James may use the word pure, as a proper admonition to the Jews, who were generally mostly solicitous to avoid legal uncleanness, such as were incurred by eating meats forbidden in their law as unclean, by touching a dead body, &c. He therefore tells them that the Christian religion is known by acts of charity, by visiting and assisting widows, the fatherless, and such as are under afflictions, and in general by keeping our consciences interiorly clean, unspotted, and undefiled from this world, from the corrupt maxims and sinful practices so common in this wicked world. (Witham)

Haydock Bible Commentary John 16:22-30

Ver. 22. The joy you will feel at my resurrection, shall ever be unalterable, and unremitting, because there I shall give you assurances and proofs of your future resurrection, and immortality. As you have been partakers in my labours, in my ignominies, and in my sorrows, so also shall you have a share in my glory, in my resurrection, and immortal bliss. Behold, these will rise to your ever unalterable and permanent joy. This is the opinion of St. Chrysostom, St. Cyril, Theophylactus, and others.

Ver. 23. In that day[4], or at that time, in that happy state, you shall not ask, you shall not need to ask me any questions: nor even desire to have any happiness, but what you will enjoy. But now if you ask, that is, petition for any thing of the Father in my name, he will give it you, whatever graces or assistances you stand in need of: ask them in my name, as I am your chief Mediator, through whose merits all shall be granted you. This is the constant practice of the Church, to ask for all graces through our Lord Jesus Christ. (Witham) — In my name. In consequence of this promise, the Church concludeth all her prayers, even those that are addressed to the saints, Per Christum Dominum nostrum, through Christ our Lord.

Ver. 24. Hitherto you have not asked any thing in my name: by the merits of me, your Mediator and Redeemer. They were not yet acquainted, says St. Cyril, with this manner of praying and petitioning, as they were afterwards. (Witham)

Ver. 26-27. In that day … I say not to you that I will ask the Father for you, or shall need to ask the Father for you, though I am your Redeemer, your chief Advocate and Mediator, by dying for all the world. — For the Father himself loveth you, because you have loved me, and have believed that I came forth from God, sent to be your Redeemer. — I came forth from the Father, both as begotten of him from all eternity; and I also came into the world, as sent from him to become man, to become the Redeemer of the world, both as God and man. Now I am going, as man, to leave the world, and go to the Father, with whom I am, and have always been, as God. (Witham)

Ver. 29. In this we believe that thou camest forth from God; that is, we are more confirmed than ever, that thou art the Messias, the true Son of God. Yet St. Chrysostom, St. Cyril, and St. Augustine, take notice, that their faith was but imperfect, till after Christ’s resurrection, and the coming of the Holy Ghost; and therefore Christ answered them, (ver. 31. &c.) Now do you believe? the hour cometh, that you shall be dispersed, &c. (Witham)[4] Ver. 23. Non me rogabitis quicquam, ouk erotesate, which commonly signifies to ask questions: but when it follows, aitesete ton patera, this is properly to petition for.

Update

Filed under: Religion-Catholicism — tobinatorstark @ 9:16 am

It has been awhile since I posted any scripture readings. Due to my old work schedule and a wedding last weekend. I will update this page. On weekdays I will provide readings for the Novus Ordo and on Sunday and any feast days necessary I will post the Tridentine Latin Mass readings. All reading in English will come from the Douay-Rheims and all Latin readings will come from the Latin Vulgate.

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